More Favorites From Photographica

While I did only take one roll of Tri-X into the show, the Hasselblad really did not let me down I loved all of the shots, and continue to review the negatives with amazement. They convey that classic 3D Hasselblad look- insane sharpness, yet a dreamy look that challenges the human eye. Each time you look at a well made frame, you notice something new.

The large aperture when used on the Planar makes a large hall look small, while drawing your subject in close. Use the scale on the barrel of the lens after estimating your subject distance. Your DOF preview will be dark, but after a while, becomes highly effective. The optional quick focus handle really is a nice tool to use.

Checking out photography books. The large aperture when used on the Planar makes a large hall look small, while drawing your subject in close. Use the scale on the barrel of the lens after estimating your subject distance. Your DOF preview will be dark, but after a while, becomes highly effective. The optional quick focus handle really is a nice tool to use.

I remember chatting with this gentleman at the last Photographica, and he always seems to be having a lot of fun.

I remember chatting with this dealer at the last Photographica, and he always seems to be having a lot of fun, and quite a pleasant gentleman.

Tonality, texture, and dynamic range are all attributes of film that I love. Not to mention the ability to capture “The Decisive Moment”-

Let's Make A Deal!

Let’s Make A Deal! Some beautiful gear, including a large format camera.

It’s going to be a long wait till the next Photographica. Shooting Hasselblad this Spring and Summer should really help the time fly.

Hasselblads For Sale (But, Not This One)

As I had my Hasselblad with me at Photographica, I decided to walk the show floor, and take a few shots. Some people stopped me in amazement, at seeing someone actually shooting with one. I don’t display this camera, I use it. others, several show attendees, and dealers, asked me if I would like to sell it. No chance. None! I bought it at Photographica 4 years ago. While it is a beast to carry and handhold, the new grip almost makes it feel light. And much easier for walking about.

I shot these with the new grip, wide strap, PME-45 prism, and trusty 80mm f/2.8 CF T* Planar. And yes, Kodak Tri-X, at ISO400. All exposures are at f/2.8, 1/60th sec., metered with the Light Meter app on my iPhone. In hindsight, I could have tried to hold steadier, and shot at 1/30th, The hall is dark! Developed with D-76.

 

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Hasselblads, and Speed Graphics, for sale! Dealer that sold the 500c/m to me 4 years ago can be seen to the far left.

Graflex, and more Speed Graphics. Large Format, anyone?

Graflex, and more Speed Graphics. Large Format, anyone?

The Hasselblad has this dreamy, yet crazy sharp look, particularly wide open. As the 80mm Planar is the fastest glass in the fleet, perfect for such dark environments. And, with people in the scene, the shots take on a mystical look, unlike any camera you’ll ever work with. It’s easy to see why Hasselblad attracts such a cult following.

Selling, and making new friends.

Selling, and making new friends.

It’s hard to see the Hasselblad leaving my hands this spring, summer, fall…NOT for sale!

Photographica, Spring 2014

After missing the last few, I was able to make it to Day 1 of PHSNE’s Photographica on Day 1 in Wakefield, MA. This year, instead of aimlessly scooping up stuff like a drunken sailor, I made a list on my iPhone, and pretty much stuck to it. There were the usual dealers asking the moon for the higher end Nikon, Leica, and Hasselblad stuff. One dealer tried to tell me that the two Nikon FE-2′s he had in the box were “most likely never even used”. Sure they weren’t. Take what some of these people say with a cynical grain of salt.  Additionally, as I mentioned to one dealer, just because it says Hasselblad on it doesn’t mean you have to pay a premium on it. There were deals to be had, and some of these people love to barter. They pretty much set up at the same physical space, with the same stuff, show after show. However, one welcomed change was moving the beloved Dollar Table from the entry area, to the back of the hall. That way, the virtual feeding frenzy could begin, without disrupting the rest of the show. The tables really did seem to have a lot less “good stuff” than in years past.

I’ve really been wanting to get back into Hasselblad photography, and decided the 500cm needed a few optional accessories to make it easier to take out into the field. Perfect timing.

But, on to the list- here is what I was able to scoop up-

  • A Hasselblad grip bracket (P/N 45071), in excellent condition, normally about $99 on eBay, for $15.
  • A Hasselblad lens shade for the 80mm Planar, (P/N 40670), about $50 eBay, for $30.
  • The wide Hasselblad strap, the 1″ rubberized (P/n59110), which I have seen selling for $40-50, for $20.
  • An extra Hassy rear lens cap, normally $8-9, for $2!!!
  • And, off-Hasselblad, an alltime favorite read, The Complete Nikon System: An Illustrated Equipment Guide by Peter Braczko, originally a $40 book, for $5. I have taken this book out of the local library at least 5 times, and it is really worth owning, despite a few errors.

I even had one dealer give me a fresh Box of Magicubes to use in the Polaroid Big Shot, and, Brian Jacobs of The G.A.S Station (GAS being Gear Acquisition Syndrome), an excellent YouTube channel, gave me a Hasselblad Rapid Winding Crank. If you have not seen Brian’s excellent video reviews of vintage cameras, be sure to check them out. His reviews of the Leica R7 and R8 are extremely well done. And while I doubt I will never get into Leica because of the cost prohibitive prices of the glass, watch them, and you will want to get them. There are lots of YouTube camera reviews, but his are really the best of their kind. Thank you, Brian!

I shot a roll of Tri-X with the Hasselblad 500cm at the show, but while the negatives hang and dry, here are a few shots I took with the Canon SD1400 IS.-

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Photographica takes place twice a year, and can be hazardous to your wallet. Make a list, and try to stick to it. I do hope that some new dealers would join the mix. Some of the same gear does tend to show up over and over again. But if you are a serious film photographer, there is no better place to be.

Bring More Than One Roll (Or, More Than One Camera)

At His Doors.

At His Doors.

This church group covered a lot of ground, having looped a large block off of Main Street. I was happy to bump into them again, as I had that desire to finish the roll. I am not sure if this is influenced by the fact that I was a digital photographer before embracing and loving film. But sometimes you want to capture as many moments as possible. This was just one of those days you wish you were Dennis Hopper’s unnamed photojournalist in Apocalypse Now, with all your Nikons strapped around your neck.

'We Have What U Need"

‘We Have What U Need”

And, it is one of those days you wish you had a whole bag filled with film with you. Good light, but even better subjects.

Happy Evangelism

Happy Evangelism

If this wonderful group ever needs a photographer to follow them and photograph them in action, I’ll gladly fill up the film bag.

Spread The Word

One Way.

One Way.

I came across this sweet group of people after photographing the bird feeder. these devoted folks were basically evangelizing while walking the streets of downtown Worcester. They did not mind having their photographs taken, in fact, welcoming it. That shows on their faces. they were happy, kind, and determined. And despite being harassed by cars driving by, and pedestrians, they forged ahead, wanting to spread their word. Groups such as this could make for great photojournalistic studies again this summer. Once again, Nikon F2S, Nikkor 35mm f/2.8 Ai, and Ilford FP4 Plus, which is maybe the closest thing we have left to Kodak Plus-X. I love this sequence, and months later, recall how warm and kind these people were to me as I photographed them.

Stop! We Want To Pray.

Stop! We Want To Pray.

Getting Ready To Walk.

Getting Ready To Walk.

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Atrevete – “dare”.

Believe

Believe

 

For once, after all the times I have tried street photography in a photojournalistic manor, jackpot. This was a very fun afternoon. I hope this group found what it was they were looking for. I certainly did. Now I see why the 35mm lens was so popular for the genre in its heyday. You can focus precisely and quickly. And, you have a perspective that looks, to my eye at least, to be more of a “normal” perspective than the 50mm does. And the lens has no distortion at all.

Feed The Birds

I went back this morning to some negatives I shot in the warmer weather. This elderly gentleman touched my heart last August. He stopped, put his gear down, fed a flock of birds near the park, and went on his way. I was afraid initially that the Nikkor 35mm focal length on my Nikon F2S might not be “long enough”. But in terms of capturing a moment, and showing the environment? It worked. The film was Ilford FP4 Plus.

Getting Hungry?

Getting Hungry?

I attempted to stay near him, stay ready, as I knew sooner or later, they would be hungry again.

Feeding Time!

Feeding Time!

He did tell me that he is in the park regularly, and likes to stop and feed birds and other little animals. Really hoping to do some more street photography when the weather warms up. It truly can be a lot of fun, and very rewarding. Hoping to make new friends and acquaintances with this wonderful passion, photography. The cold weather has lasted long enough.

 

Turners Falls And The Mohawk Trail

As mentioned here many times, I was a student at Fitchburg State College, now Fitchburg State University. The institution boasts a world renowned Communications Media, and Photography department. Professor Peter Laytin (www.peterlaytin.com), author of the book Creative Camera Control, studied under Minor White, and is considered to be one of the true pioneers of infrared photography. The campus is on the foothills of The Mohawk Trail, a historic Native American Trade Route, and represents the gateway from Central to Western Massachusetts.

I took a drive a few weeks back, almost 70 miles one way, and arrived in virtually another world. Turners Falls, Massachusetts, which is on the Mohawk Trail, and is in Western Massachusetts, and in on the Connecticut River. It is a village that is part of the town of Montague. it is SO far out that you can hear FM stations from Albany, NY, which I listened to in the car when I was there. The drive there is truly spectacular, as Route 2 and the Mohawk Trail narrows down to one lane, as it winds near, and over, the river.

The view from the bridge.

The view from the bridge.

Once arriving in Turners Falls, I am reminded of a world that time forgot. The quaint downtown area almost looks like a smaller, cleaner, Beacon Street in Boston. This kind gentleman, working at The Montague Reporter, the local newspaper, saw me with my D300, and gave me some hints as to where to journey to and photograph-

"I know where you should go to photograph..."

“I know where you should go to photograph…”

He was not kidding. Walking back through downtown, I found some spectacular architecture-

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Vintage brick.

This collection of gorgeous buildings, known as The Power Town Apartments, features some breathtaking architecture-

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Power Town

On the way back over the bridge, I came across this gorgeous view, of a frozen section of The Connecticut River. I have not done digital landscape in a while. This might reignite the passion-

Frozen Tundra

Frozen Tundra

Leaving now, of course, I cannot wait to return. With the next blog article, and, eventually, another visit-

Soon to return.

Soon to return.