Hasselroid

I really do wish it was this fun.

I really do wish it was this fun. Notice how hard it is to see the actual small exposure on the sheets of pack film. Cover of a vintage Hasselblad guide. Darkslide is in the right retaining area.

 

The good news? It can be done. When I bought my Hasselblad 500c/m kit four years ago, I was thrilled that it came with the Hasselblad Polaroid 100 magazine back. Able to load “crack and peel” packfilm, this was used back in the day by professional photographers, before the days of digital, to check their exposures. After the recent demise of Fuji FP-3000B B&W instant, the only formula left is Fuji FP-100C. A 100 speed film, it’s perfect for outdoor exposures, flash exposures, and checking your 100 speed roll film exposure calculations. 3.25 X 4.25. Not using 100 speed film in your roll film magazine? Well, you can make the right stop calculations.

The not so good news? It really makes little sense. If you insist on trying it, make sure the glass lens on the Polaroid back is spotless, and clean it with a rocket blower, some compressed air, and a soft cloth. And stuff on the magazine’s glass will show on the exposure. What they usually don’t tell you, not even in most dedicated YouTube videos on the subject, you are limited to the 2 1/4 X 2 1/4 square that normally fills your negative. This is the major drawback, and the one that takes most of the wind out of the sails. So, on your Fuji instant 3.25 X 4.25 sheet, you have a smaller square with the exposure, and the remaining part of the sheet, well, black. I guess what I am saying here is, well, the concept sounds more exciting than the actual execution. Here is a test shot, with flash-

Carl Zeiss Hasselblad lens meets Polaroid Model 100, still the best way to exploit instant pack film.

Carl Zeiss Hasselblad lens meets Polaroid Model 100, still the best way to exploit instant pack film. On top of the 1980’s vintage bag I use to house my Hasselblad system. Padded, with individual sections for body, lens, backs, accessories.

After wasting a few sheets indoors to get close to the right flash exposure, it was time to get the system outside, to use natural light. I had a much easier go at it. And, was still able to play with that legendary Hasselblad depth of field.

Lake Quinsigamond

Lake Quinsigamond

The most challenging part of the shot above? Scanning, and clone stamping the dust out. The funny thing I see a lot online is people who have these soft, dreamy, pastel looks. How they achieve it with Fuji color instant film, well, I’d love to know. My guess is Photoshop. Here
is a much lighter exposure-

Leaf, captured by a leaf shutter.

Leaf, captured by a leaf shutter.

Then again, anyone besides this guy, who enjoys Hasselroid photography, please, let me know. I am going back to Hasselblad photography, and Polaroid photography. Not sure they are the right marriage.

If he uses the chimney finder regularly, she should divorce him. Hasselblad gear is normally so elegant.

If he uses the chimney finder regularly, she should divorce him. Hasselblad gear is normally so elegant-but I have yet to see a good looking chimney finder. And, where is his dark slide?

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