Geometry And Texture- Blackstone Canal

“To take a photograph is to align the head, the eye and the heart. It’s a way of life. To take a photograph is to hold one’s breath when all faculties converge in the face of fleeting reality.” – Henri Cartier-Bresson

I love the geometry of Cartier-Bresson’s work. While many identify him with photojournalism, and being the master of “the decisive moment”, what often goes forgotten is how brilliant his composition was. And the lines that his subjects naturally created. And yes, Cartier-Bresson did, on occasion, shoot landscapes- sometimes including people, sometimes not. It is easy to “pigeon hole’ Cartier-Bresson as simply a street photographer or photojournalist. But, he really did try new things visually. And took full advantage of lines, curves, shadows, shapes. Mostly within the physical size limitations the 35mm format.

Last November, in a rare creative frenzy, I decided to challenge my eye, and incorporate some textures, shadows, and geometry. The Blackstone Canal, which links Worcester, MA to Providence, RI, was a great spot for this exercise. While the canal technically is closed today, it is listed in The National Register Of Historic Places. And is loaded with, you guessed it, geometry.

I shot these at sunset, with my Nikon N80, and 50mm f/1.8 D. May need to get back there with the wide-angle sometime soon. Kodak Tri-X, shot at box speed, contrast to the max.

Favorite Shot From The Day- This Bridge Spans Overhead

Favorite shot from the day- this bridge spans overhead

That's a minivan racing underneath

That’s a minivan racing underneath

Inside the overpass

Inside the overpass

Abandoned tracks, and branches- love the track's symmetry, and asymetric branches, and how they contrast

Abandoned tracks, and branches- love the track’s symmetry, and asymetric branches, and how they contrast

Purposeful underexposure can be a good thing. Actually glad I underexposed here, as it contrasts with the water movement.

Purposeful underexposure can be a good thing. Actually glad I underexposed here, as it contrasts with the water movement.

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