Running On Empty- Using Up The Last Few Boxes Of Plus-X

Down to a precious few boxes of Eastman Kodak Plus-X in the fridge. At last count now, there are two boxes left of “The Forgotten Film”, with two rolls still to be developed. Here are some of the more recent rolls, shot last month in Clinton, MA, at Wachusett Reservoir. The Nikon F3 has been getting quite the workout. These were taken with the 28mm AiS, and 135mm f/2.8 Ai.

Being down now to two rolls of this gorgeous material, I am likely going to be a lot more selective of subject and composition. Then again, if Hunt’s Photo has any more left, it might make a great excuse for the pilgrimage into Melrose. They had tons of it a couple of months ago. I still maintain that this was the most underrated film in the Kodak lineup, color or B&W.  Venerable, reliable, and gorgeous. Yes, there are still alternatives, including Ilford FP4 Plus. But to this untrained eye, Plus-X had a finer, more pleasing to the eye grain structure, with stronger contrast. In their marketing, Ilford will talk about the benefits of cubic grain structure. But I just loved the look of Plus-X. Nothing scientific here, it just looked nicer.

A sidenote just released this month, the last full-length motion picture film to be shot on Kodak Plus-X- Paul Bunnell’s “The Ghastly Love of Johnny X”. He beat out the producers of “The Artist” for the last batch, who had to shoot that film in color, and then convert it in post to B&W.  This new independent will be known as the last of an era.

Years from now, when the death knell for film is finally sounded, the discontinuation of Plus-X is going to be remembered as the event signalling the beginning of the end. Anyways, here are the shots-

You can see the dam in the upper left of the shot.

You can see the dam in the distance, and the waterfall.

Reflections can look awesome in B&W.

Reflections can look awesome in B&W.

Limited by the 135mm focal length on a full frame focal plane, I tried to emphasize the heron's shadow/reflection.

Limited by the 135mm focal length on a full frame focal plane, I tried to emphasize the heron’s shadow/reflection.

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